Season 7

Working in Retirement

Episode Notes

If you want to work part-time in retirement, it's never been easier to find the kind of job you want. And it’s not just lower-paying, physically demanding jobs at retail stores and restaurants. With employers desperate to find workers, many are putting aside their biases against experienced and technically savvy older workers and allowing many to work at home or on their own schedules.  And if you’re still working full-time but would like to ease your workload, your company may offer a phased retirement program that lets you gradually reduce your work hours over time while still retaining your benefits. Even if you officially leave your full-time employer, you may have the opportunity to work for them part part-time or as a consultant. However, the key to remaining a coveted part-time worker is to keep up with the skills that employers find valuable, whether it’s learning new technologies and staying current with the business trends in your industry. 

For further research: 

Recent Podcasts

Season 7
Why Women are Leading Sustainable Investing

Show Episode Notes

In this episode, Pam, Terry and Richard discuss the pros and cons of socially responsible investing, whose increasing popularity is being driven mainly by women. In particular, they examine whether women sacrifice returns by investing in stocks or ESG funds that align with their personal values. The answer may surprise you.

For further research:

Janine Firpo, Activate Your Money: Invest to Grow Your Wealth and Build a Better World

Season 7
5 Tips for 401(k) Rollovers

Show Episode Notes

Directly rolling over a 401(k) plan to an IRA with a custodian like Fidelity, Schwab or Vanguard is something most people should do as soon as possible after they retire. Why? Because most 401(k) plan investment options are designed for people saving for retirement, rather than for those who need their nest egg to generate income to help pay for everyday expenses. Rollover IRAs offer access to a wider variety of investment options, many of which may have lower expenses than the funds in your 401(k) account. But since you may need money in your IRA to last 20 years or more, you may not feel confident making your own investment decisions. A low-cost robo-advisor can automatically invest your rollover IRA money but won’t be able to answer your questions or address your concerns. That’s why it may be worth paying more for the services of a fee-only fiduciary financial advisor. They not only can manage your investments but can come up with a comprehensive plan to address the financial opportunities and challenges you may face during retirement. 

For further research: 

Show Episode Notes

Podcast Hosts

Pam Krueger

Pam Krueger

Terry Savage

Terry Savage

Richard-Eisenberg

Richard Eisenberg

Stay Tuned Into Friends Talk Money

Copyright © 2021 FriendsTalkMoney.org